Matisse adnd Picasso.jpg

Matisse adnd Picasso.jpg

Manet - the luncheon on the grass

Manet - the luncheon on the grass

Monet - Impression sunrise.png

Monet - Impression sunrise.png

Berthe Morisot - A women at a toilet.jpg

Berthe Morisot - A women at a toilet.jpg

Chenonceau.jpg

Chenonceau.jpg

Delacroix - Death of Sardanapalus.jpg

Delacroix - Death of Sardanapalus.jpg

Notre Dame de Paris.jpg

Notre Dame de Paris.jpg

Rodin - The Thinker.jpg

Rodin - The Thinker.jpg

George de la Tour - The new born.jpg

George de la Tour - The new born.jpg

Matisse - the dance.jpg

Matisse - the dance.jpg

FRANCE THROUGH THE AGES

Gorman Arts Centre

  1. Romanesque Art (11th to 12th centuries): Architectural innovation and emergence of a new artistic trend during the medieval period, from Merovingian art to the emergence of Romanesque art.

  2. Gothic art period (13th to 15th centuries): Technical innovation and revolution in Architecture. Review of the most famous cathedrals in the north of France.

  3.  Renaissance and Mannerism (15 th - 17 th centuries): The school of Fontainebleau and the elaborate construction of many of the 'Loire chateaux' and the majestic tapestries of “The Lady and the Unicorn”.

  4. From classical Baroque to French Rococo (17 th and 18 th): Baroque coincides with the works of Rubens, Lorrain and Poussin as we as the construction of Versailles. Rococo is characterized by scenes of amorous encounters, light-hearted entertainment.

  5. Neoclassicism and Romanticism (18 th and 19 th century): Two great masters: David and Ingres epitomized the time of the French Revolution. Delacroix will reaffirm the power of light and colour over design.

  6. Realism and Impressionism (late 19 th century): Gustave Courbet and Edouard Manet sought to convey a truthful and objective vision of contemporary life. Impressionist artists emerged in the mid-nineteen century in opposition to the finished style of academic painting. The artists, such as Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Auguste Renoir, and many more revolutionised Western conceptions of painting.

  7. Post-Impressionism (late 19 th and early 20 th centuries): Post-Impressionism is a term used to describe the reaction in the 1880s against Impressionism. It was led by Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh and Georges Seurat. It is seen as the birth of Modern Art.

  8. Fauvism and Cubism (20 th century): Two of the most innovative, daring and radical developments in the history of art. Fauvism and cubism will lead the Art into a new era where its concept and definition will be deeply challenged.