Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh painting sunflowers.jpg

Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh painting sunflowers.jpg

The Lady and the unicorn.png

The Lady and the unicorn.png

The Lady and the Unicorn 2.png

The Lady and the Unicorn 2.png

Van Gogh, The Night Cafe.png

Van Gogh, The Night Cafe.png

Van Gogh, Harvest at La Crau.png

Van Gogh, Harvest at La Crau.png

Marc Chagall Paris through the window.jpg

Marc Chagall Paris through the window.jpg

Marc Chagall I and the Village.jpg

Marc Chagall I and the Village.jpg

Marc Chagall the Birthday.jpg

Marc Chagall the Birthday.jpg

​Van Gogh and Gauguin in the South of France

Saturday, February 5th, 10-12 pm

Gorman Arts Centre

Few artists have ever seen life so intensely or realised their vision in such splendid fullness. Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin both experimented with the expressive possibilities of colour and line to create distinct personal styles of painting. Working in France at the end of the nineteenth century, the two friends inspired each other during a nine-week period in the autumn of 1888.


The Lady and the Unicorn

Saturday, April 9th, 10-12 pm

Gorman Arts Centre

The Lady with the Unicorn consists of a set of six tapestries dating from the late fifteenth to early sixteen century. They owe their name to the presence of a lady and a unicorn in a garden populated by animals and flowers on each tapestry. The meaning of the cycle has been much debated. Experts generally agree that they present a meditation on earthly pleasures and courtly culture, offered through an allegory of the senses.

The poetic imagery of Marc Chagall

Saturday, April 23rd, 10-12 pm

Gorman Arts Centre

Marc Chagall composed unique images based on emotional and poetic associations. He painted dream-like subjects rooted in personal history and Eastern European folklore. Art for Chagall was first and foremost a means of personal expression. He preferred to be considered separately from other artists, his imagery and allegory uniquely his own, fusing his own personal, dreamlike imagery to be regarded as the symbol of the “painter as poet”.